Interview with the authors: response to amphibian-killing fungus is altered by temperature

Recently, Drs. Ellison, Zamudio, Lips, and Muletz-Wolz published their work focused on some of the ways amphibians respond to an infection by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Bd is a fungus that is causing devastating worldwide decline of amphibians, meaning that understanding how some species manage the infection is important for conservation of myriad species. Using an elegant experimental set up and subsequent RNA sequencing data, Dr. Ellison and co-authors suggests that the variation in amphibian susceptibility to the fungus, which is related to temperature, occurs due concurrent temperature-dependent shifts in immune system function; lower temperatures were associated with an inflammatory response while higher temperatures with an adaptive immune response. Understanding exactly how and when this fungus alters wild amphibian populations is important for conservation of these often imperiled species. For more information, please see the full article and the interview with Dr. Ellison below. 

Eastern red-backed salamander (Plethodon cinereus). Photo credit: Alberto Lopez.

What led to your interest in this topic / what was the motivation for this study? I have always been fascinated with how parasites and pathogens influence fitness and shape host populations, particularly generalists infecting a wide range of host species. The pathogenic chytrid, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is arguably one of the most generalist pathogens known to science, capable of infecting hundreds of amphibian species globally. However, even within a single host species, disease outcome (e.g. succumbing to or clearing infection) is highly variable and is often temperature-dependent. Given the devastating impacts Bd has already had on amphibian populations, the recent discovery of another amphibian-killing chytrid (B. salamandivorans), and the ever-pressing threat of climate change, we were driven to uncover how amphibian gene expression responses to chytrid infections vary under different temperatures.

What difficulties did you run into along the way? For me, it was the sheer scale of the sequencing dataset. Plethodon salamanders, notorious for their large genome sizes, had yet to have a published genome or transcriptome to use as a reference for RNAseq studies such as ours. Therefore, we had to ensure sufficient sequencing to de novo assemble the transcriptome, and enough per-sample depth to capture potentially subtle but important changes in gene expression due to temperature and infection. With multiple temperature treatments and multiple disease outcomes at each temperature, this resulted in relatively large RNAseq dataset of over 2 billion reads. Thankfully, having returned to Wales from the US by the time we received our sequence data, I had access to Supercomputing Wales, a nationwide high-powered computing initiative that allowed me to handle the computationally intensive analyses. More importantly, without the hard work of the other authors to carefully design and execute the highly-controlled animal experiments to generate the tissue samples, this study would simply not be possible.

What is the biggest or most surprising innovation highlighted in this study? I think that, within a relatively narrow thermal range, the substantial shifts in the types of immune genes being expressed in response to infection is really important to our understanding chytrid infection dynamics. The finding that adaptive immune transcripts (particularly those involved in MHC pathways) are more highly expressed at warmer temperatures – where amphibians tend to survive infection better – is most exciting. Given the growing evidence for the importance of certain MHC allele variants in Bd resistance, our results suggest it is not only be what MHC genotype amphibians possess, but how they express them during infection that dictates survival.

Moving forward, what are the next steps in this area of research? This study, while providing new insights into how temperature influences Bd-amphibian interactions, has generated many further questions. Some of the authors on this study have recently shown both temperature and Bd has a significant impact amphibian skin microbiome communities, a potentially critical line of defense against infections. It is currently unknown whether temperature-dependent host immune expression responses to Bd shapes skin microbiomes during infection or if skin bacteria are influencing host responses (or a combination of both). Work to directly assess host gene expression under different microbial community compositions would be an exciting future avenue of research. In addition, further investigation of both MHC genotype and expression phenotype simultaneously could be highly relevant to understanding intraspecific variation in chytrid resistance. Finally, we have previously developed methods to quantify Bd gene expression in vivo; it would be fascinating to couple our current findings with how Bd genes are expressed in-host under different temperatures.

Dr Carly Muletz-Wolz field sampling. Photo credit: Karen Lips.

What would your message be for students about to start developing or using novel techniques in Molecular Ecology? Many others on this blog have already highlighted the importance of well thought out experimental designs, and the need to grips with the theory before embarking on a project, that I can only echo. Although having now worked on many transcriptomic datasets in non-model organisms, I still sometimes get overwhelmed with the amount of information that could be potentially conveyed in a manuscript, particularly with more complex experimental designs such as this study. I recommend periodically taking a step back from your analyses, share it with colleagues to gauge the most important “headline” results, and finally, don’t worry that some things have to go as supplemental material; they can still be gems of information that kick-off an exciting new line of inquiry for someone!

What have you learned about methods and resources development over the course of this project? With high-throughput sequencing methods becoming ever more accessible and the explosion of innovative ways to analyse and present NGS data, it is all too easy to feel your project is not “cutting-edge” enough. It’s all very well having billions of sequences and a slick set of figures, but a research team most importantly needs to be able to provide meaningful biological/ecological interpretation. That’s why it has been great to be part of a collaborative team of amphibian ecologists and geneticists, which was critical to the development of this new resource of information on salamander transcriptomic responses to temperature and infection.

Describe the significance of this research for the general scientific community in one sentence. The thermally-altered transcriptional responses of salamanders to fungal pathogen infection is an important component to understanding observed seasonal and climatic patterns of chytrid disease outbreaks. 

Describe the significance of this research for your scientific community in one sentence. Our results suggest shifts from inflammatory to adaptive immune gene expression responses to Bd infection at warmer temperatures are a key component to thermal and/or seasonal patterns of amphibian chytridiomycosis.

Eastern red-backed salamander (Plethodon cinereus). Photo credit: Dr Carly Muletz-Wolz.

Ellison A, Zamudio K, Lips K. Muletz-Wolz C. 2019. Temperature-mediated shifts in salamander transcriptomic responses to the amphibian-killing fungus. Molecular Ecology 28:50586-5102.

Interview with the author: Creating the SPIKEPIPE metagenomic pipeline

Reliable abundance estimates is a significant challenge for eDNA metagenomic studies. One important issue is that sequencing introduces multiple sources of noise that can significantly alter the accuracy of abundance estimates. Here we interview Douglas Yu, a professor at the University of East Anglia, about the SPIKEPIPE pipeline recently published in Molecular Ecology Resources. This method is particularly exciting as it can use either short read barcodes or mitogenome data to estimate species abundances by accounting for sequencing noise using correction factors. They test this eDNA pipeline on arthropod samples taken from the High Arctic in Greenland and show that this approach can produce remarkably accurate species abundance estimates compared to samples of known composition. Read the full article here and get the code to run this pipeline here.

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The 5 steps of SPIKEPIPE.

What led to your interest in this topic / what was the motivation for this study? 

We very much want to know how a heating climate is affecting biodiversity. Greenland is a direct window into this, both because heating has progressed very fast here, and because local species richness is manageable for study:  375 known aboveground arthropod species at the Zackenberg research station. Equally important, the Danish research station at Zackenberg had had the foresight to systematically collect arthropods starting in 1996, and those samples were sitting in ethanol in a warehouse in Denmark. The main obstacle to using them had been that no one could identify the hundreds of thousands of individuals to species level. Luckily, Helena Wirta and Tomas Roslin had in parallel carried out a DNA barcoding campaign at Zackenberg. Put together, we had in our hands a complete time series of community dynamics over a stretch of time during which summer had almost doubled in length. 

What difficulties did you run into along the way? 

When we started, we were all set to use metabarcoding. However, we soon learned (not surprisingly) that the sample-handling protocols had not been designed with molecular methods in mind:  the trap water was reused across time periods, the collecting net was used across traps, and the sorting trays were not bleached between samples. We thus needed a protocol that would be robust to cross-sample contamination and would ideally return quantitative information, since we wanted to detect change in population dynamics. This is why we turned to mitochondrial metagenomics (Tang et al. 2015, Crampton-Platt et al. 2016) and came up with SPIKEPIPE, which combines read-mapping, a percent-coverage detection threshold, and a spike-in to correct for pipeline stochasticity. 

What is the biggest or most surprising innovation highlighted in this study? 

The individual elements of SPIKEPIPE were reasonably well known, but what we hadn’t anticipated is just how accurate the results were when combined in a single pipeline. With mock samples, we found no false-positive species detections (when the percent-coverage threshold is applied) and recovered highly accurate estimates of intraspecific abundances (in terms of DNA mass). With resequenced environmental samples, we found high repeatability of abundance estimates across sample repeats, even though DNA extraction and Illumina library prep, sequencing, and base-calling all inject stochasticity into datafile sizes.

Also very gratifying was finding that SPIKEPIPE returned useful data even when mapping reads only to short DNA barcodes, as originally presaged by Xin et al. (2013). This means that we can make use of the existing vast DNA-barcode reference library.

Moving forward, what are the next steps in this area of research?

SPIKEPIPE is of course only the means to an end, and our next goal is the statistical analysis of community change in a rapidly heating ecosystem. Nerea Abrego and Otso Ovaskainen are now applying joint species distribution modelling (with the R package Hmsc, Tikhonov et al. 2019) to the dataset of 712 pitfall-trap samples. One important question is to quantify how much of the year-to-year variation in species abundances can be attributed to species interactions, as opposed to climate variables. 

More broadly, the result that SPIKEPIPE can be used with DNA barcodes makes possible an intriguing strategy:   one may now generate both the species reference database and the sample-by-species table from the same set of samples. We are using Greenfield et al.’s (2019) Kelpie software to carry out targeted assembly of DNA barcodes from shotgun-sequenced bulk samples, which we compile into a single DNA-barcode reference database, against which we then map reads from each sample to generate the data table. 

What would your message be for students about to start developing or using novel techniques in Molecular Ecology? 

Build in a lot of testing:  multiple, complex mock samples for pipeline development, repeat environmental samples to measure repeatability, realistically complex positive controls, many negative controls, and many sanity checks as you work through your bioinformatic code. 

You are likely to be learning to code at the same time that you write your first pipelines. Take the extra time *now* to learn and apply robust coding techniques, even if there are easier but less robust methods available. 

Read Jenny Bryan’s tutorial on file naming:  https://speakerdeck.com/jennybc/how-to-name-files

What have you learned about methods and resources development over the course of this project? 

A great way to inspire new methods is to talk with non-molecular researchers about their scientific questions, currently used methods, and available sample types. Our team includes arctic ecologists, molecular ecologists, and a mathematician.

For one’s method to have impact, it will need to be useful for years after one first thinks of it. Stay up to date with technology trends, including costs, to avoid rapid obsolescence.

Describe the significance of this research for the general scientific community in one sentence.

We can use DNA sequencing to quantify how insect and spider communities respond to environmental change.

Describe the significance of this research for your scientific community in one sentence.

Mitochondrial metagenomics is a viable alternative to amplicon sequencing for characterising arthropod communities. 

Interview with the authors: Massive introgression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in newt hybrid zones

Hybridization is a mechanism by which adaptive alleles can cross species boundaries and possibly boost the adaptive potential of hybridizing species. This may be especially true for alleles that confer a selective advantage when rare, which is common among major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes involved in pathogen defense. We therefore would expect MHC genes to introgress across hybridizing species relatively easily, though there exists relatively few examples supporting this hypothesis. In this paper from Molecular Ecology, Katarzyna Dudek, Tomasz Gaczorek, Piotr Zieliński, and Wiesław Babik document the extent of introgression in MHC variants across two hybridizing European newts across replicated transects. Read below for a behind-the-scenes look at their paper!

Link to the study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/mec.15254

F1 hybrid male. Photo from M. Niedzicka

What led to your interest in this topic / what was the motivation for this study? 
The evolutionary significance of adaptive introgression is increasingly appreciated and many examples have been described, but few generalizations are available. There is a relatively well understood mechanism – novel/rare allele advantage – which should promote introgression of genes evolving under balancing selection (a prime example of these are MHC genes). However balancing selection itself produces signatures resembling introgression, so convincing demonstration of introgression in genes under balancing selection is difficult. Hybrid zones, especially in the form of replicated transect, are among the best tools you can imagine for such a project. And we’ve been studying these newts for some time – in a way this study was motivated by our long standing interest in adaptive introgression, but it’s an off-shoot of another project (see the paper in the same issue of Mol. Ecol.).

What difficulties did you run into along the way? 
The most difficult part was the design and justification of simulations that we used to rule out explanations alternative to introgression. Because MHC in newts is multi-locus and shows extensive copy number variation, it’s been difficult to design simulations that would at the same be time realistic and feasible. This may sound surprising, but genotyping and interpretation of MHC variation has not been a major problem, although the system is quite complicated. It seems that the field has matured enough that exon-based genotyping of MHC variation has become a standard. Another frontier would be population genetic analysis of entire MHC haplotypes, extremely interesting but currently beyond reach in non-model (and most model) taxa.

Field sampling. Photo from M. Liana

What is the biggest or most surprising finding from this study? 
The scale of apparently adaptive introgression. It’s not only that MHC variants introgress – we have suspected this before. One could expect that a single or a handful of novel, introgressed MHC haplotypes would be favoured in the recipient species, but we found massive introgression, apparently involving tens or more haplotypes, most likely in both directions. It’s been quite a surprise for us – this suggests that introgression can really remodel MHC variation in hybridizing species – an influx of large amount of variation may cause species to share, at least locally, pool of MHC variation.

Moving forward, what are the next steps for this research?
A natural next step is to test generality of our findings. The mechanism of novel/rare allele advantage should operate rather universally. If so, we expect that MHC genes will be among the last genes to stop introgressing between species that still hybridize, but are strongly reproductively isolated genome-wide. In other words we expect MHC introgression should be detectable (and perhaps strong) in systems, where despite hybridization, there is very little genome-wide introgression. We’ve been lucky to obtain funding for a collaborative project, in which we are going to test this prediction using over twenty hybrid zones from major vertebrate groups. We’d also like to look at the process at the level of entire haplotypes, but this would need to wait until technologies mature.

Albino L. montandoni male. Photo from W. Babik

What would your message be for students about to start their first research projects in this topic?
The most important would probably be: have your questions worked out and if you find a system that is good to address them – go for it. Try to understand the available theory, there’s nothing more practical than good theory to guide you and to save countless hours of your precious time. And finally, start writing before you think you’re ready. Writing is the best way to have your ideas clear, to spot weak points and see things you didn’t realized before.

What have you learned about science over the course of this project? 
Over and over again – that science is unpredictable. That reality mocks your well laid out ideas and plans, twisting and turning your paths, but if you recognize and follow the opportunities that appear on the way, everything will be fine :). For example something that appears as an offshoot of a major project may turn out at least equally interesting and important. Two key components are good and diverse collaboration and the scale of research appropriate to your question – that is just large enough to provide sound answers, but not necessarily larger.

Field sampling pt 2. Photo from W. Babik

Describe the significance of this research for the general scientific community in one sentence.
Our research suggests that MHC introgression may be a widespread process that introduces novel and restores previously lost variation, boosting the adaptive potential of hybridizing taxa.

Citation
Dudek, K., Gaczorek, T.S., Zieliński, P. and Babik, W., 2019. Massive introgression of MHC genes in newt hybrid zones. Molecular Ecology. 28(21). 4798-4810. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/mec.15254

Interview with the authors: RAD‐sequencing for estimating genomic relatedness matrix‐based heritability in the wild: A case study in roe deer

Working on non-model organisms comes with both challenges and rewards. While the joy and satisfaction of uncovering knowledge in wild populations drives many scientists, the lack of genomic resources can be a roadblock for many important research themes, such as determining the extent of evolutionary potential and response to selection. In this paper from Molecular Ecology Resources, Laura Gervais and co-authors demonstrate the potential for RAD-sequencing to overcome these challenges and estimate heritability and evolutionary potential in wild populations, even for non-model organisms without many existing genomic resources. Read below for a behind-the-scenes look at their paper!

Link to the study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/1755-0998.13031

Image result for Capreolus capreolus
Photo of male and female roe deer (Capreolous capreolus) from Wikimedia Commons

What led to your interest in this topic / what was the motivation for this study? 
We are interested in how natural populations adapt to environmental changes. These changes occur rapidly and there is an urge to accumulate results on wild populations’ capacity of adaption for a wide range of species. Traditionally, measuring the evolutionary potential of a trait required long-term field surveys of phenotypic data and genetic relatedness obtained from a multi-generational pedigree. This is challenging to obtain because many free-ranging populations are hard to sample with the intensity required for pedigree reconstruction. We believe that genome-wide data and in particular RAD-sequencing data might be an opportunity to overcome this issue but we still lack an accessible practical framework to go from genomic data to the estimation of a population’s evolutionary potential.

What difficulties did you run into along the way? 
We had to overcome two main methodological difficulties. First, to investigate the effects of the sequencing strategy and the SNP calling/filtering procedure ultimately on GRM-based heritability, we had to run a considerable amount of bioinformatic and quantitative genetic analyses, which both proved to be time consuming. Secondly, there was not much methodology available on how to implement genomic relatedness matrix in a quantitative genetic linear mixed model. We hope that our work will make this approach more easily accessible.

What is the biggest or most surprising finding from this study? 
When we started the study, we did not expect that it would be possible to run genomic quantitative genetic analyses with only a few hundred individuals. Most of our colleagues were skeptical when we mentioned that we found significant heritability (at the beginning with only 170 genotyped individuals). Our results give hope that evolutionary potential studies in the wild might be virtually accessible for any natural population when using the appropriate sampling and sequencing design.

Moving forward, what are the next steps for this research?
We are working to combine genome-wide data with intensive bio-logging technology (data on animal movement) and high-resolution habitat information. The synergy between these three high-density data technologies offers a great opportunity to understand how species adapt to environmental changes across complex landscapes.

What would your message be for students about to start their first research projects in this topic?
Our message would be to never hesitate to contact people and surround yourself with all the necessary help. This is a domain that evolves rapidly and that is very exciting but may be quite disconcerting. It seems essential to remain informed and open-minded. Lastly, I would say that self-learning is really rewarding but that there is always the opportunity to ask for help to learn and get over a problem efficiently.

What have you learned about science over the course of this project? 
We have learned that more interdisciplinary exchanges between ecologists, molecular biologists and bioinformaticians are useful and can help to build such an integrative approach. This may be challenging as they often have different views on different issues that need to be conciliated. There is a need to meet and exchange ideas to get the most out of this type of projects.

Describe the significance of this research for the general scientific community in one sentence.
This study sheds light on a unique opportunity to evaluate whether species have the genetic potential to adapt to environmental changes, and this for virtually any non-model organism.

Citation
Gervais, L., Perrier, C., Bernard, M., Merlet, J., Pemberton, J. M., Pujol, B., & Quéméré, E. RAD‐sequencing for estimating genomic relatedness matrix‐based heritability in the wild: A case study in roe deer. Molecular Ecology Resources. 19(5). 1205-1217. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1755-0998.13031

Interview with the authors: testing the role of ecological selection on color pattern variation

The color variation that exists among individuals has lent itself to the study of selection since Darwin. Recently, Zaman, Hubert, and Schoville (2019) investigated the effects of selection on the diversity of the wing color pattern in the butterfly Parnassius clodius across a large portion of its range. These researchers found evidence supporting the idea that coloration may serve as a warning signal to predators, providing some predator avoidance benefits to individuals. In addition, the variation of solar radiation and precipitation observed geographically across sites was negatively correlated with the amount of melanin observed at each site. This suggests that the occurrence of melanin may provide a selective advantage in the form of thermoregulatory function. For more information on how selection influences butterfly wing coloration, please see the full article and the interview with Dr. Schoville below. 

Parnassius clodius mating, male located below female. Photo by Sean Schoville.

What led to your interest in this topic / what was the motivation for this study? Khuram and I were both interested in butterfly color pattern variation, and in particular, cases where there might be competing selective pressures acting on wing pattern phenotypes. Most work on butterfly wing patterns focuses on predator-prey interactions and aposematic colors, but butterfly wings are essential to flight performance and important in thermal regulation. A number of recent papers have shown that butterfly color pattern appears to be responding to climate warming, and then there are well-known cases (such as alpine Colias, thanks to Ward Watt) where thermoregulation has been linked to basking behavior and the pigment on wings. Thus, in examining variation in Parnassius clodius (which occurs over a broad elevation and latitudinal range), we hoped that we could decouple environmental signals that might act on different wing color elements. 

What difficulties did you run into along the way? Sampling our butterflies across this large region was a major challenge, particularly as adult flight times are rather short (two to three weeks). And then we were surprised by the strong difference in adult phenology across sites (some adults are active in May, others in late July). This is evident regionally (Utah versus Washington), and across elevation within a region. In the end, it required three years of effort, with some very long road trips from Wisconsin.

What is the biggest or most surprising innovation highlighted in this study? After some initial efforts to link aposematic variation (red eyespots) indirectly to predator communities (through climate variables that might covary with predator abundance), we realized this was too tenuous. So, we were delighted to discover publicly available data on bird abundance. While this did not solve the problem (perhaps due to lack of spatial resolution in the bird data), I think using this data to analyze butterfly wing patterns was one of the more innovative aspects of our paper. We had a much easier time linking spatial climate data to melanization (dark pigmentation). As an aside, this raises the important point that some data, i.e. abiotic environmental data, is much easier to come by than biotic data. This is unfortunate, as we expect biotic selective forces to be equally or more important drivers of microevolution in some cases.

Lead author on this study, Khuram Zaman, after a day of collecting samples. Photo by Sean Schoville.

Moving forward, what are the next steps in this area of research? We’d like to extend this work in two directions. First, we’d like to connect color pattern traits to underlying genes and measures of heritability. Although the genes controlling butterfly color pattern are well studied, to date no representative of the snow Apollo subfamily Parnassinae have been included in these efforts. Members of the family are tremendously variable and quite stunning in their dramatic contrasts of color. Second, experiments are needed to link our inferences of ecological selection to fitness differences, as well as performance in the field. Physiological assays of melanic variants, coupled with mechanistic thermodynamic models, have been developed for Colias butterflies (see Joel Kingsolver and Lauren Buckley’s work). This type of modeling could provide important connections to conservation of Parnassius clodius populations under changing climates, and might perhaps extend to conservation work on other highly threatened Parnassius species.

What would your message be for students about to start developing or using novel techniques in Molecular Ecology? The development of novel approaches is a key part of advancing biological knowledge, but it can be a daunting endeavor given the breadth and scope of the scientific literature nowadays. Integrating multiple approaches, on the other hand, can equally help to advance our knowledge and provide opportunities to address long-standing questions. This is the direction we took in this paper. My personal view is that students should to try to master multiple techniques (assemble a toolkit, so to speak) and apply those techniques to fundamental problems. Hopefully, it’s a lot of fun in the process and leads to interesting collaborations!

What have you learned about methods and resources development over the course of this project? We are entering a golden age of data-rich resources, in terms of spatial environmental data and genomics data. These increasingly provide the power to test refined hypotheses about evolutionary and ecological processes, and are becoming more accessible to all researchers. One of my favorite accomplishments in the paper is using genetic covariance data among populations (relatedness data) as a covariate in fitting morphology ~ environment models. The use of such population contrasts is important in controlling for non-independence in the data due to ancestry. While we have known about the importance of genetic covariance in hypothesis testing for some time (thanks to Joseph Felsentstein’s work), it is only recently possible to use genome-wide data. This provides very precise measures that are highly informative, and enabled us to rule out the role of genetic drift as a driver of wing pattern variation. 

Describe the significance of this research for the general scientific community in one sentence. Our research demonstrates that butterfly wing color patterns evolve in response local climate conditions, as a way to regulate body temperature.

Describe the significance of this research for your scientific community in one sentence. Our work demonstrates that elements of butterfly wing pattern phenotypes respond independently to different sources of selection, with climate variation acting on thermoregulatory ability as an important driver of butterfly color pattern.

Parnassius clodius basking to thermoregulate. Photo by Sean Schoville.

Zaman K, Hubert MK, Schoville SD. 2019. Testing the role of ecological selection on color pattern variation in the butterfly Parnassius clodius. Molecular Ecology 28:50586-5102.

Interview with the authors: Environmental heterogeneity and not vicariant biogeographic barriers generate community‐wide population structure in desert‐adapted snakes

Phylogeographic studies have long focused on striking biogeographic barriers, and comparative phylogeography often looks for shared divergence across such barriers as evidence of shared responses to similar environments across taxa. However, in addition to such barriers, geographic distances and local adaptation to environmental heterogeneity may shape genetic divergence. In their recent Molecular Ecology paper, Myers and colleagues collect genomic data from 13 co-distributed species of snakes from Southwestern North America and evaluate the relative importance of biogeographic barriers, geographic distance, and environmental heterogeneity in structuring genetic divergence. Much of the previous phylogeographic work in this region has focused on divergence across a prominent biogeographic barrier: the Cochise Filter Barrier (CFB), which separates the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts, and divergence across this barrier has been suggested to be an important factor driving divergence in snakes from the region. Though they expected to find a prominent role of this barrier, instead, Myers and colleagues find strong support for geographic distance and environmental heterogeneity as important factors structuring genetic divergence, but less support for biogeographic barriers. Further, they find that different variables contribute most to divergence across the 13 taxa studied, highlighting the importance of species-specific responses to environmental variation. Read the full article here, and read below for a behind-the-scenes interview with lead author Edward Myers.

What led to your interest in this topic / what was the motivation for this study? 
As a research team we have a general interest in what factors are promoting population genetic differentiation and whether codistributed species have similar evolutionary histories in response to shared environmental changes over time. Specifically, in this system where there is a well known biogeographic barrier (Cochise Filter Barrier; CFB), we were interested in whether entire assemblages of taxa show similar population structure. Initially the motivation for this study was to assess the degree of co-divergence across the CFB, however, as we analyzed these data it became clear that we needed to incorporate spatial and environmental data to understand population divergence. This study also allowed me spend a significant amount of time in the field collecting tissue samples from snakes!

What difficulties did you run into along the way? 
One of the biggest difficulties with this study was handling and analyzing all the generated data. We had almost 400 samples sequenced for radseq, so processing and analyzing these data took a significant amount of computational time. Also, one difficulty was the logistics of collecting fresh tissue samples for all of these species across the southwestern US and northern Mexico, but issues like this are easily over come by collaborating.

What is the biggest or most surprising finding from this study? 
The biggest surprise from this study is that patterns of isolation-by-distance and isolation-by-environment are more important in explaining population genetic differentiation than a commonly cited biogeographic barrier. This result really stresses the importance of incorporating spatial analyses when analyzing phylogeographic data because aspatial analyses may result in spurious results of population structure and mislead our ideas of what is driving population divergence and speciation.

Moving forward, what are the next steps for this research? 
Moving forward I plan to generate whole genome sequence data for species within this system to understand what loci may be under selection in response to environmental heterogeneity. Given the strong signature of IBE I expect to find patterns of strong selection along transects of temperature and precipitation across the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts. Further, I am interested in how other regions globally that have been cited as important biogeographic barriers in phylogeographic studies might also be strongly influenced by patterns of IBD and IBE, and not vicariant barriers.

What would your message be for students about to start their first research projects in this topic? 
There is so much great work published in the field of landscape genetics and comparative phylogeography and I would suggest that students start by combing through that work first. But as general advice I would suggest that students really explore their data in a meaningful way and spend some time thinking about what factors could be responsible for similar patterns observed in a genomic data set (e.g., IBD vs vicariance or selection vs historical demography).

What have you learned about science over the course of this project? 
I have really learned that genomic data should be carefully analyzed as to not be influenced by preconceived ideas of the system that you might be working within. Also, I think that this is becoming more and more true, but you have to collaborate in order to do great science.

Describe the significance of this research for the general scientific community in one sentence.
This work demonstrates that codistributed species do not have shared evolutionary histories, and that they do not respond to the same landscape and shared environment in similar ways.

Describe the significance of this research for your scientific community in one sentence.
Our work shows that simple patterns of isolation-by-distance and isolation-by-environment have contributed to population genetic differentiation more so than commonly cited biogeographic barriers.

Full article: Myers EA, Xue AT, Gehara M, et al.Environmental heterogeneity and not vicariant biogeographic barriers generate community‐wide population structure in desert‐adapted snakes. Mol Ecol. 2019;28:4535–4548. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.15182

Interview with the authors: quality and quantity of genetic relatedness data affect the analysis of social structure

Understanding the influence of relatedness on fine-scale social interactions within a population is fundamental to understanding the role of kinship in animal societies. In this study, Foroughirad et al provide insight into the quality of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) data required to obtain accurate and precise parentage assignments and relatedness coefficients using data from a long‐term behavioural study on bottlenose dolphins with a known partial pedigree. They then go on to explore how the quality of these estimates influence post-hoc analyses exploring the relationship between relatedness and social structure. Again, they provide important practical guidance about the quality of data needed for these types of analyses. This article was published in Molecular Ecology Resources: read the full article here, and read our interview with Vivienne Foroughirad, lead author of the study, below.

An adult female bottlenose dolphin with her six-month old calf. Photo Credit: Vivienne Foroughirad

What led to your interest in this topic / what was the motivation for this study? 

In the broadest sense my research interests concern the evolution of sociality and complex social behaviors such as cooperation. To that end, I was interested in our ability to parcel out contexts in which cooperation occurs between kin versus between unrelated individuals. Non-kin cooperation is rare is animal societies, and a common way to search for examples is to first investigate the link between the strength of social relationships and the genetic relatedness of pairs. Since genotyping-by-sequencing is now cheaper and more accessible than ever, I wanted to explore the effects this increased resolution would have on our power to test the relationship between social structure and relatedness, especially in viscous populations with strong philopatry.

What difficulties did you run into along the way? 

In our case, the greatest challenges centered around maintaining a longitudinal study on a wild marine mammal with a large enough sample size to make answering these types of questions feasible. We were lucky to have over 30 years of data available from the Shark Bay Dolphin Project which allowed us to verify some of the reconstructed pedigree relationships, as well as measure detailed home range usage and social associations. An analytical difficulty we encountered is how to account for the confounding effect of philopatry or limited dispersal on social relationships with kin if you want to distinguish kin discrimination from more passive kin associations that are a byproduct of shared space use. 

What is the biggest or most surprising finding from this study? 

We provided evidence that genotyping-by-sequencing methods could produce more precise relatedness values than typical microsatellite analyses, which isn’t surprising. What was less well-understood was the effect this would have for downstream analyses, such as those testing whether relatedness correlated with social affiliation. We found that even though our study species exhibits strong, life-long affiliative relationships between maternal kin, there were a surprising number of scenarios under which our analysis failed to detect a significant correlation between genetic relatedness and social associations. We also found surprisingly diminishing returns in relatedness resolution with increasing sample size (number of individuals) when small numbers of markers were used. 

Moving forward, what are the next steps for this research? 

Pedigree reconstruction is rapidly improving, especially where there is access to new genetic resources such as chromosome-level assemblies for non-model organisms. Improved kin assignment methods will allow us to investigate the function of these relationships at the level of the individual, which will help us to tease out how both intra- and inter-specific variation in ecology and demography affect social behavior. Within my own study site, I’m using these data to look at the effect of family size on social network position and reproductive success, as well as the demographic conditions that facilitate the formation of non-kin bonds. We’re also working on ways to better discriminate between maternal and paternal kin, which will be important for investigating the mechanisms of kin recognition.

What would your message be for students about to start their first research projects in this topic? 

That this is a great idea! Rapid advances in technology will open up new avenues of inquiry and there is lots of work to be done. Nevertheless, as with any field, you also need to know when to stop and submit. There will always be a new higher coverage genome or updated version of the software you’re using that’s about to be released, but if you keep reanalyzing your data with each advance, you’ll never finish a project. My second piece of advice would be to practice simulating data and analyzing it. Building simulated datasets, tweaking parameters, and testing different software has really deepened my understanding of methodologies- plus you can start before you even get your first sequencing results and be ready with a tested pipeline when you do get results in hand.

What have you learned about science over the course of this project? 

That building a robust, reproducible, and well-documented pipeline for analysis is crucial. It might take a bit more work to set up, but it’s always worth it. I also benefitted a lot from the opportunity to present my work to audiences from different disciplines which helped me keep the big picture in mind since I’m the kind of person that gets easily caught up in minutiae. Biologically, I’m always reminded that there’s so much individual variation that gets masked by conducting analyses at the population level, and that rather than being discounted as noise, that variation could be leveraged to ask really interesting questions about how ecology and demography affect behavior. 

Describe the significance of this research for the general scientific community in one sentence.

The correlation between genetic relatedness and the strength of social relationships can be masked by the limited power of typical published sample sizes.

Describe the significance of this research for your scientific community in one sentence.

We provide practical guidance for how sample sizes and sequencing methods might interact to improve precision of relatedness estimates and their effect on the analysis of social structure, using wild bottlenose dolphins as a case study.

Three juvenile male bottlenose dolphins surface synchronously. Photo Credit: Vivienne Foroughirad

Foroughirad, V., Levengood, A. L., Mann, J., & Frère, C. H. (2019). Quality and quantity of genetic relatedness data affect the analysis of social structure. Molecular Ecology Resources, 1181–1194. https://doi.org/10.1111/1755-0998.

Interview with the authors: Linking plant genes to insect communities: Identifying the genetic bases of plant traits and community composition

Much research in community genetics attempts to understand how genetic variation influences community composition, but the majority of studies have been done at the level of the genotype. In their new Molecular Ecology paper, Barker and colleagues use genome-wide association mapping in aspen (Populus tremuloides) to identify specific genes that may influence variation in tree traits or in insect communities. They uncover 49 SNPs that are significantly associated with tree traits or insect community composition. Notably, insects with closer associations with host plants have more genetic correlations than less closely associated insects. Barker and colleagues find a SNP associated with insect community diversity and the abundance of interacting species, providing a link between genetic variation in aspen and insect community composition. Finally, they find that tree traits explain some of the significant relationships between SNPs and insect community composition, suggesting a mechanism by which these genes may influence community composition. Read the full article here, and get a behind-the-scenes interview with lead author Hilary Barker below.

What led to your interest in this topic / what was the motivation for this study? 
For some time, we have been interested in extended phenotypes – the idea that the genes of an organism not only shape the immediate traits of that organism, but also extensions of these traits, such as the community of insects living on a tree. Yet, until our study, most of the previous research had been largely focused on differences across genotypes of ‘host’ organisms (e.g., aspen, cottonwoods, evening primrose), rather the underlying genes. Thus, there were a lot of unknowns yet to be discovered. For instance, would the genetic effects be large enough to detect and identify? Would more underlying tree genes be found for insects that are more closely associated with the tree (i.e., leaf gallers) rather than free feeding insects? Would there be an overlap between genes associated with insect communities and genes associated with particular tree traits? 

What difficulties did you run into along the way? 
I think the largest challenge of conducting a Genome-Wide Association study on a common garden of trees is the planting and maintenance of this small forest. We had 1824 trees that needed planting, phenotyping, and care. This work was most intense in the first four years of the study to ensure that each tree survived a summer drought and multiple harsh winters. The next most challenging hurdle was conducting the insect surveys. These surveys involved a large team effort and happened during some of the hottest days of the summer. 

What is the biggest or most surprising finding from this study? 
The most exciting finding from this study was the identification of an aspen gene (early nodulin-like [ENODL] transmembrane protein, Potra001060g09097) that underlies insect community composition; both diversity and the abundance of key insect species (aphids and ants). While we do not yet know the mechanism by which this gene influences insect communities, we do know that this protein is involved in the transportation of carbohydrates. Thus, it’s possible that this gene directly influences aphids and ants via their interactions with carbohydrate-rich honeydew, and/or indirectly influence insects via numerous tree traits, including both growth (size) and defense. To our knowledge, this is the first identification of allelic variation in a plant gene that is associated with a complex insect community trait (i.e., insect community composition).

Moving forward, what are the next steps for this research? 
The next step of this research is to explore how the genetic underpinnings of these aspen traits and associated insect communities may vary across different environmental gradients and with tree ontogeny. Previous research has shown that aspen growth and defense traits vary with tree age, and these traits play a significant role in determining which insects will feed upon the foliage. Thus, the genetic contributions of insect community composition may vary substantially for more mature trees. The Lindroth lab is currently working on an expanded version of this study with more detailed traits and mature (reproductive) trees. In addition, gene expression will vary with different environmental conditions, which will likely also modify which genes are most important in shaping insect communities.

What would your message be for students about to start their first research projects in this topic? 
To complete a large community genomics study such as this, you will need a few key things. First, you will need a lot of help. Start recruiting anyone and everyone in sight. Mentoring undergraduates will be essential and ensuring that you can effectively asses the learning of your mentees and volunteers is critical (e.g., can they correctly identify X insect? Can they successfully complete X protocol in the lab?). Second, get organized. Project management platforms can be really helpful (e.g., Asana, MS Teams, etc.) to keep track of tasks. Third, refine your R markdown scripts. You will generate more data than you know what to do with, and thus creating R scripts to clean up, organize, and analyze your data will be a top priority. Also, if you can get a digital microscope (e.g., Dino Lite), then the tedious task of keying out insect specimens will be much easier and less cumbersome! I highly recommend it.

What have you learned about science over the course of this project? 
In terms of a genome-wide association study, it is best to have as large a sample size as possible (more genotypes and genetic variation). You do not want to invest a lot of resources into a study that has low statistical power for association testing. Also, phenotype as many traits as you can. At the onset, it is impossible to know which genes, if any, will be associated with which traits. Thus, you could end up with a lot of investment while identifying a small number of associated genes, or potentially no genes at all. 

Describe the significance of this research for the general scientific community in one sentence.
Our findings show that specific genes in a host organism can shape the composition of associated communities.

Describe the significance of this research for your scientific community in one sentence.
Complex extended phenotypes such as community composition have an identifiable genetic basis, and thus we can use this information to test and study the extent and limitations of community evolution.

Full article: Barker HL, Riehl JF, Bernhardsson C, et al. Linking plant genes to insect communities: Identifying the genetic bases of plant traits and community composition. Mol Ecol. 2019;28:4404–4421. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.15158

Interview with the authors: glacial refugia and the dispersal of terrestrial invertebrates

Antarctica is an extreme and isolated environment that supports a variety of species. However, we know little about how terrestrial species survive in these kinds of conditions. In a recent paper in Molecular Ecology, McGaughran and colleagues investigated a widespread group of terrestrial invertebrates to understand how species have persisted in this harsh environment. These researchers found that there were many local clusters of individuals with substantially more long-distance dispersal events than were previously identified. These long-distance dispersers were likely aided by wind, providing an interesting example of the link between environmental conditions and population stability. For more information, please see the full article and the interview with McGaughran, lead author of the study, below. 

Antarctic Peninsula taken near the tip. Photo created by Dr. Ceridwen Fraser.

What led to your interest in this topic / what was the motivation for this study? 
During my PhD, I researched genetic and physiological diversity of Antarctic terrestrial invertebrates, spending a collective ~6 months on the ice.  I then stepped away from Antarctic research for several years, completing postdocs in Germany and Australia, but I never forgot my time in Antarctica or my love for its unique environment.  Thus, I’ve maintained collaborative links that have allowed me to continue to contribute to Antarctic research.  In this study, we wanted to see whether genomic data would give us greater insight to the evolutionary history of invertebrates along the Antarctic Peninsula than had been gained with single-gene analysis in the past.  

What difficulties did you run into along the way? 
Getting workable quantities of DNA from tiny (~1 mm) springtails to use in genomic applications is difficult.  In fact, for this study, we tried to extract DNA from several Antarctic springtail species, but were only successful in our attempts with Cryptopygus antarcticus antarcticus.  Low DNA concentrations can also mean that the genomic data we end up with for analysis is patchy.  These aspects provide some challenges, but the methodologies underlying library preparation and sequencing are continually improving and we are excited about the potential of applying genomic methodologies to more Antarctic taxa in the future.

What is the biggest or most surprising finding from this study? 
Using genome-wide data, we were able to find evidence for a greater frequency of dispersal events than had been previously shown with single-gene data.  This was particularly surprising because dispersal for Antarctic invertebrates is hard.  These animals live under the rocks in moist ice-free areas.  As soon as they leave the relative safety of the soil column, they are exposed to freezing and desiccating conditions.  Thus, though we have some evidence to suggest that springtails can survive for short periods in humid air columns or floating on water, our expectation is that such events would be rare.  Finding genetic evidence that suggested several instances of successful dispersal over extremely long geographic distances was therefore surprising.

Moving forward, what are the next steps for this research? 
Much of the Antarctic literature focused toward understanding evolutionary and biogeographic questions has been based on single-gene analyses because genomic approaches are still relatively new.  This previous work has been informative about the fact that many Antarctic terrestrial species have survived glaciation in refugia, but there is much that remains to be discovered.  Antarctica is a kind of barometer for the rest of the world and it is important that we understand how species there have responded to environmental change in the past and how they may do so in the future.  Thus, key to extending this research will be to bring genomic approaches to bear on other populations and species in Antarctica.  This will help us to gain an understanding of how isolated Antarctica really is, and how its endemic species will likely respond to future environmental changes.

What would your message be for students about to start their first research projects in this topic? 
In this genomic and associated bioinformatic era, learning the skills of a well-rounded biologist who has a breadth of understanding that spans the field, the laboratory, and the computer, can be daunting.  As you develop or use novel techniques in Molecular Ecology, my message would be to stick with it through the hard stuff.  It is such an exciting time to be an evolutionary biologist and, though it can involve some really tough moments, the revelations we can achieve about how the world works are key.  Alongside this, I would suggest that collaboration is now more important than ever – don’t feel like you have to reinvent the wheel or be an expert on every single aspect of your research.  Instead, develop your own niche and share in the expertise of those around you to do the best science together.

What have you learned about science over the course of this project? 
When I first started doing research, there was no such thing as genomics or next generation sequencing and we simply didn’t have the means to gain genome-wide data.  In recent years, the face of evolutionary biology has changed due to the revolution in sequencing technology and bioinformatics.  As exemplified by this project, I’ve learned that genomic data can provide new and more nuanced insights into our biological questions of interest.  And, though it can be hard at times to work in such a swift-moving area of research, it is ultimately very rewarding.

Describe the significance of this research for the general scientific community in one sentence.
The environment, especially wind, plays an important role in structuring patterns of genetic diversity among Antarctic populations – thus future climatic changes are likely to have a significant impact on the distribution and diversity of these populations.  

Describe the significance of this research for your scientific community in one sentence.
Bringing genomic data to bear on long-standing evolutionary questions in Antarctica is a worthwhile and fruitful endeavour that will ultimately produce greater insights into understanding and protecting Antarctic taxa.

Dry Valleys taken in the Antarctic Dry Valleys. Photo created by Dr. Angela McGaughran.

McGaughran A, Terauds A, Convey P, Fraser CI. 2019. Genome‐wide SNP data reveal improved evidence for Antarctic glacial refugia and dispersal of terrestrial invertebrates. Molecular Ecology. 28:4941-4957. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.15269.

Interview with the authors: Parent and offspring genotypes influence gene expression in early life

Early life stress can often have long-term fitness effects on organisms, and the molecular mechanisms behind this have long been of interest to biologists. While much work has demonstrated that changes in DNA methylation patterns are involved, the transcriptional effects of early life stress are less well-understood, particularly at a genome-wide level. In a recent Molecular Ecology paper, Daniel J. Newhouse and colleagues investigate the transcriptional effects of different parental care strategies in white-throated sparrows. In white-throated sparrows, there are two morphs, and two associated mating pair types: tan male x white female (TxW) pairs, and white female x tan male (WxT) pairs. While TxW pairs provide biparental care, WxT pairs provide female-biased parental care. Newhouse and colleagues use RNA sequencing to assess the transcriptional effects of these differences in parental care strategies. They find evidence of an elevated stress response in offspring of WxT pairs, which provide female-biased parental care. For more information, read the full article, and see the in-depth interview with the authors below.

 A white morph female white-throated sparrow feeding her nestlings. Photo credit: Tiffany Deater.

What led to your interest in this topic / what was the motivation for this study? 
Early in graduate school, I participated in the white-throated sparrow genome sequencing project. That project was my crash course in white-throated sparrow biology, and the unique genetics and associated behaviors of the sparrows fascinated me. Most work on white-throated sparrows focuses on the adults, but nestlings are relatively understudied.  Depending on the adult pair type of the nest, nestlings will either receive biparental care (parents=tan morph male & white morph female) or female-biased parental care (parents=white morph male & tan morph female). Essentially, I wanted to see how this parental care variation impacted the nestlings.

What difficulties did you run into along the way? 
Finding white-throated sparrow nests was much harder than I ever imagined. Hiking through bogs while fighting off swarms of biting insects made it even more difficult. Thankfully, I have wonderful collaborators who are amazing at finding nests.
Also, when we designed this study, there weren’t many examples of RNA-seq from bird blood. White-throated sparrow nestlings are very small, so the amount of blood we can collect is quite small. RNA extractions proved more difficult than expected, but we managed to sequence a sufficient amount for the study.

What is the biggest or most surprising finding from this study? 
It was surprising to see a solid signature of morph-specific gene expression. As adults, there are many differences in the transcriptome between morphs and these correlate strongly with their behavior. White-morph and tan-morph nestlings look the same and do not exhibit any morph-specific behaviors like we see in adults. Despite this, we found that a large number of genes found within the chromosomal inversion are differentially regulated. Some of these genes have also been previously identified in the brain of adult white-throated sparrows. It was cool to see the same genes appear very early in life and in a much different tissue (blood).

Moving forward, what are the next steps for this research? 
From a genomics perspective, it would be great to identify the regulatory mechanisms underlying the gene expression signatures we identified here. Additionally, within a single nest, there are both white morph and tan morph nestlings. This allows us to look at nestling morph specific responses to variation in parental care. We identified some differences between the morphs within a nest, but were ultimately limited by sample size to discuss this in depth. I think this will be a really interesting topic to explore further.

What would your message be for students about to start their first research projects in this topic? 
I suggest pursuing integrative projects, like much of the work published in Molecular Ecology. Associated with that, I suggest networking and establishing collaborations early. We can’t all be experts in everything, so collaborating with research groups that complement your interests can be beneficial.
More generally, keep up with the literature as much as you can. The more you know about your system and anything related to it, the better. Don’t forget to read up on methods papers, too. Data analysis is very important so having a grasp on analytical concepts will really help.

What have you learned about science over the course of this project? 
There’s no universal way to analyze data. There are so many tools to process genomic data, so it can be overwhelming at times to keep track of everything. I also learned that data analysis takes much longer than you plan. Inevitably something won’t work, so keeping a positive attitude throughout is crucial.

Describe the significance of this research for the general scientific community in one sentence.
Parental genotype is correlated with a transcriptomic stress response in their offspring.

Describe the significance of this research for your scientific community in one sentence.
Half of all adult white-throated sparrow pairs provide female-biased parental care and this stable parental care strategy induces a transcriptomic stress response in their offspring.

Newhouse DJ, Barcelo‐Serra M, Tuttle EM, Gonser RA, Balakrishnan CN. Parent and offspring genotypes influence gene expression in early life. Mol Ecol. 2019;28:4166–4180. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.15205.